One Equal World

Posts Tagged ‘trans bathrooms

A photo of the outside of a Target store.

Photo credit: Jonathan Weiss / Shutterstock

This decade has seen a long parade of businesses publicly wearing the rainbow. It’s difficult to tell, in most cases, whether they’re honestly supporting their LGBT customers, or just courting an emergent customer base from an angle historically denied.

On May 12th, 2017, Target announced a new line of products to feature LGBT imagery, for the fifth year in a row. Their “Take Pride” products are mostly bold, rainbow-printed clothing, and each purchase will see half of the proceeds donated to the Gay, Lesbian, and Straight Education Network (GLSEN).

Optimistically, Target doesn’t seem to be only talking the talk. The Minnesota-based mega-corporation has also fiercely defended their policy allowing trans people to use their correct restrooms, and have made a point to be a good employer for trans and LGBT people as well. Many Target locations require gender inclusivity training of their management team members.

Furthermore, they coordinate volunteer opportunities for their employees at both the store and corporate levels to work with LGBT initiatives and charities, most of that volunteer labor matched by corporate contributions. They even used their commercials in 2014 to campaign for same-sex marriage, effectively putting their money where their mouth is.

The commercial with which they launched their newest line is a good one. It hints at the wealth and struggles of LGBT history with archival footage of major milestones, indicating a real recognition of the cause they are supporting, not merely a lip-service token.

The products themselves are summer-themed, whimsical, and fun. T-shirts featuring a dinosaur, unicorn, or pocket-cat waving a Pride flag. There’s even one with a rainbow spread like butter on toast. Shawls, pins, badges, and bumper stickers. A beach towel. Children’s tees declaring their love for moms or dads. Everything a person could want to let the world know on which side of LGBT history they intend to stand on.